• Building Tall in a Small City

    At 70 meters tall, Hotel Alsik is an impossible to miss addition to the skyline of Sønderborg. 

  • The Danish harbor town of Sønderborg, just north of the German border, has long drawn visitors for its provincial way of life: Hiking trails, historical interpretive centers and coastal fishing have made the town a destination in the region.

    Now, Hotel Alsik will add a new dimension to the map. It is designed to amplify the new energy of this masterplan, adding cosmopolitan allure to the city center and circulating urban activity throughout its surroundings.

    The tower’s 19 stories are also a stark contrast to the traditional low-rise brick architecture that dominates the streets of Sønderborg. For Louis Becker, principal and partner at Henning Larsen, the architectural ambition of Hotel Alsik to balance new development with a sense of local identity.

    “We wanted this building to rise as an homage to local history, adapting heritage toward new horizons,” Becker says. “We see Hotel Alsik as a beacon that announces Sønderborg as a city in development, a gathering point that benefits the local community while setting the stage for new visitors and growth.”

    The color palette of Hotel Alsik’s aluminum and glass façade reflects the orange, red and brown hues that define the weathered brick of Sønderborg’s harborfront heritage. An abstracted brick motif weaves its way up the hotel’s façade – Where the traditional building material meets its modern interpretation, Hotel Alsik balances context with contrast. At the top of the hotel is an observation deck, fully open to the general public, with floor-to-ceiling glass windows offering stunning panoramic views of the town and surrounding countryside. At night, the glow from within crowns Hotel Alsik with a band of warm light – A visual parallel to the beam of a lighthouse; a homage to Sønderborg’s seafaring history.

    Opened in June 2019, Hotel Alsik opens a new chapter for the city of Sønderborg, directing the storied local history and architectural tradition toward a new urban resurgence.

You have added a new link to your collection You have deleted a link from your collection